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Back You are here: Home Columns Weekly Columns For Your Consideration For Your Consideration: The President’s Correct

For Your Consideration: The President’s Correct

By CHARLIE ALLO
Contributing Writer

President Obama has suggested that the 2012 election will be over two divergent ideologies; this is a position that few would find fault with. 
The President has made it clear that he is not interested in adhering to the spirit of the Constitution as our Founders envisioned it.
The best approach to utilize in evaluating the ideology that is being implemented by the President’s administration is to look at the actions being taken; one should disregard the rhetoric that is used to explain the motivation behind the action. 
The motivation is usually give to sell a given action, and it’s usually dressed in well meaning motives, regardless of the practicality of the action.
The ideology that is being applied to our governmental system is diametrically opposed to the system that our Founders drafted for the nation.
The Founders created a system with three branches of government that would act to control the growth and power of government, but over the generations there has been a movement to enhance the size and scope of the central government, especially that of the Administrative Branch; this administration has moved the system even closer to this position, and has also managed to supplant Congress’s power to legislate with the use of executive orders and the parsing of words in ways that were not intended.
President Obama has been extremely successful in his efforts to transform the government, and the prime vehicle for this transformation was the Affordable Healthcare Act.
This massive legislation may have been passed by Congress, but it was not constructed by Congress; to this day it’s unlikely that more than five percent of the members of Congress have any real grasp of what this legislation does, or what impact it will have on our society.
The real problem is that the legislation is still going through expansions within the agencies and departments that will be responsible for the administration of the Act.
This Act has done more to fundamentally transform our government than any other legislation in our history, but this fact may not be apparent, to many, until it’s fully implemented. The Administration has done a fantastic job of highlighting five or six aspects of the legislation that appear to be acceptable to many of our citizens; it has also managed to divert most of the public’s attention from many of the major problems within the legislation.
This legislation is still evolving, which means that the total impact will not be known for some time to come.
This Act is going to require a massive expansion of agencies and departments within the public sector, and there is a strong possibility that new departments will be added to the current mix. This Act will have accomplished a major portion of the President’s goals if it’s allowed to stand. There’s an old saying that suggests one should be careful about what they wish for, because they may get it; this Act should receive a high degree of scrutiny, and there is insufficient time to do that before its implementation.
The electorate is very close to choosing one of the two competing ideologies: one will fundamentally change our government; the other is far from what our Founders laid out for us, but it will give the Nation some time to get back on the intended course.
The electorate would be making a mistake in thinking that this is just another election, and that the individuals vote is unimportant. Are we going to have a strong centralized government with a major portion of the power in the Executive Branch, or will the electorates opt for a system that moves the nation closer to what the Founders envisioned for us?