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Back You are here: Home Columns Weekly Columns Hardware Tips Hardware Tips: Lemon-Aid For Rust Stains and Ceramic Tile Over Vinyl Floors

Hardware Tips: Lemon-Aid For Rust Stains and Ceramic Tile Over Vinyl Floors

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ISLAND TRUE VALUE TACKLE & HARDWARE
801 N. Lake Park Blvd.   Carolina Beach, NC  28428 Phone: (910) 458-3049  
Fax: (910) 458-0988

Rust Stains: Let's say you're sitting around relaxing on your patio and just as you're about to squeeze some lemon into a nice cool drink you notice some annoying rust stains on the concrete caused by your aging metal outdoor furniture and being the perfectionist you are it bothers you, but what to do? Set down your drink and go in search of cleaning solutions and a wire brush?
No need, relax, the answer is at hand literally. Of course we mean the lemon you are holding in your hand.
First finish squeezing it into your drink, then simply reach down and rub what's left on the rust stains then wipe with a soft towel or cloth and presto mundo they'll disappear long before your summer guests arrive or your ice cubes melt.
Ceramic Tile: Ever since the “Roaring Twenties” ceramic tile floors have been the cat’s pajamas. But if you’ve already got a vinyl floor that’s looking kind of worn and shoddy how are you going to say “twenty-three skidoo”? Tear it up? Throw it out? Start from scratch? You don’t have to.
Here’s why -- and what to do. Even if your floor is worn, as long as it isn’t loose and coming up, you can put new ceramic tile directly on top easily. First, use a belt sander to score the vinyl surface.
Then apply two coats of bonding agent to help the adhesive hold better. Next carefully lay out chalk lines. Start laying tile from the center working outward toward the ends. Keep it simple; use pre-mixed mortar, working on small areas at a time.
Let it dry a full day before you grout, then use diluted white vinegar on a damp cloth to remove the haze and make it shine.
You won’t believe the difference. Your little bungalow soon will be looking like the Hearst castle -- and you’ll be putting on the Ritz.
Bonus Tip: Cleaning Fiberglass Tubs and Showers:
To whip up a special batch of our famous salt-and-turpentine cleaner, take 1-quarter cup turpentine and add 2 to 3 tablespoons of table salt.
Big families, hard water and heavy traffic can leave tubs and showers a real mess. If they're fiberglass rather than porcelain, that means lots of rubbing and scrubbing that often does nothing at all.Though you've tried, that grungy mess just won't budge.
So what do you do?
Use a jackhammer? Dynamite? To whip up a special batch of our famous salt-and-turpentine cleaner, take 1-quarter cup turpentine and add 2 to 3 tablespoons of table salt.
Mix well and then scrub with a stiff nylon brush. It's powerful, so be sure you've got plenty of ventilation. Don't rinse it away when you're through.
Rather, use paper towels to clean up the mess and air-dry them out. Before you give them a toss, wash it with soap, then a coat of car wax.
And that’s the tip of the week from Island True Value Tackle & Hardware.