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Back You are here: Home News Local and State News State Unemployment Rate Decreases In New Hanover County and 81 Counties

Unemployment Rate Decreases In New Hanover County and 81 Counties

RALEIGH, N.C. : August 28th, 2013 - Unemployment rates (not seasonally adjusted) decreased in 81 of North Carolina’s counties in July, increased in nine and remained the same in ten. Twelve of the State’s metro areas experienced rate decreases, one increased and one remained unchanged.
Scotland County had the highest unemployment rate at 16.0 percent while Currituck County had the lowest at 5.3 percent.
Among the Metro areas, Rocky Mount at 13.3 percent experienced the highest rate and Asheville at 6.8 percent had the lowest.
The July not seasonally adjusted statewide rate was 9.1 percent. When compared to the same month last year, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in 97 counties, increased in two and remained unchanged in one. All 14 metro areas experienced rate decreases. The number of workers employed statewide (not seasonally adjusted) increased in July by 16,507 to 4,319,371, while those unemployed decreased 6,726 to 431,935. Since July 2012, the number of workers employed statewide increased 25,227, while those unemployed decreased 45,241.
It is important to note that employment estimates are subject to large seasonal patterns; therefore, it is advisable to focus on over-the-year changes in the not seasonally adjusted estimates.
The statewide unemployment rate release for August 2013 is scheduled for Friday, September 20, 2013.
North Carolina’s statewide unemployment rate (not seasonally adjusted) was 9.1 percent in July. This was a 0.2 of a percentage-point decrease from June’s revised rate of 9.3 percent, and a 0.9 percentage-point decline over the year.
Over the month, the unemployment rate decreased in 81 counties, increased in nine and remained the same in 10. Forty-two counties had unemployment rates below the state’s 9.1 percent rate.
Scotland County recorded July’s highest unemployment rate at 16.0 percent, decreasing 0.2 of a percentage point from the previous month. Edgecombe County had the second-highest rate at 14.7 percent, increasing 0.2 of a percentage point.
Currituck County had the lowest unemployment rate at 5.3 percent, followed by Chatham at 6.1 percent and Orange at 6.2 percent.
Unemployment rates decreased in 12 of the state’s 14 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). The Rocky Mount MSA had the highest unemployment rate in July at 13.3 percent, followed by Fayetteville at 10.6 percent. Asheville reported the month’s lowest unemployment rate at 6.8 percent, which decreased 0.3 of a percentage point from the previous month. Durham/Chapel Hill followed at 7.1 percent.
In July 2013, there were 33,904 Regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) Initial Claims filed in North Carolina.
New Regular Initial Claims, totaling 23,807 for the month ending July 2013, decreased 4,881 from the prior month. Three percent were Attached New Initial Claims. During the same period a year ago, New Claims totaled 38,533, of which 29 percent were Attached. For the month ending July 2011, New Claims totaled 37,247, of which 25 percent were Attached Claims.
Over the month, net industry employment decreased in all 14 MSAs. The Charlotte/Gastonia/Rock Hill MSA had the largest net employment decrease with 18,300, followed by Greensboro/High Point with 6,900. Fayetteville experienced the greatest percentage decrease at 3.1 percent. It is important to note that employment estimates are subject to large seasonal patterns; therefore, it is advisable to focus on over-the-year changes in the not seasonally adjusted series. Over the year, employment rose in 13 MSAs. The Charlotte/Gastonia/Rock Hill MSA had the largest net employment increase with 22,200, followed by Asheville with 5,200, and Raleigh/Cary, 5,100. Asheville had the greatest percentage increase at 3.1 percent. Rocky Mount reported no change.
Source: NC Dept of Commerce - Labor and Economic Analysis Division